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Posts Tagged ‘humor’

Cover Image In this lighthearted, fluffy vampire novel, Raye introduces us to Lil Marchette, a born vampire who prefers pink to black.  She has decided not to go into the family business (copying, not mob related at all) and start a matchmaking business for humans, vampires, and others.  There is only one problem….she can’t seem to get any clients and there is a murderous man on the loose hunting down women who go to dating agencies.  Plus her parents keep setting her up with eligible born vampires (yes, apparently in this world vampires can have children) while she is getting the hots for a made vampire that she has no right to be looking at.  It is completely irreverent and more chick lit than vampire.  It reminds me a bit of Marta Acosta’s work.  There is obviously more to the story of Lil and it should be fun to see where Raye takes it.  

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I happened to pick this book up at a bookstore the other day so I would have something to read while my husband went shopping.  I love books about vampires and this one looked good.  I have to say that I loved it! I have found a great new vampire series and I am delighted.  The book’s cover does not reveal how witty and laugh out loud funny the book it.  The Accidental Vampire is the story of Elvi Black (formerly Ellen Stone) who was turned into a vampire by accident on a trip to Mexico.  Elvi and her friends (all mortals) watch cheesy movies to find out what Elvi needs to do, but as many of them are getting older (most are in their 60s), they decide to help Elvi out by finding her a mate, a vampire mate to be specific.  After placing an ad in the paper, they incur the wrath of the council for having outed the vamprie community.  Luckily, Victor Argeneau is sent and soon realizes that they are not trying to flout the laws because no one there knew they existed.  Soon Elvi has a troop of men following her around to see what she will do next.  This takes conventional vamprie myths and turns them on their ear.  Added to that is a town full of people who would do anything to protect their own hometown vampire.  It is a wonderfully sweet story, but also very funny.  Now I just have to go read the rest of the series to see if they are as good as this one! I can’t wait!!!!

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Holm has done a great job with Babymouse and she does not disappoint here.  This is the story of Ginny Davis, a 7th grader, who is having a rough year.  Told through To Do lists, IMs, homework, notes, letters, and report cards, you delve into the world of Ginny and all the trials and tribulations of being in middle school.  The format reminds me of the Regarding the Fountain books by Klise.  Kids are always asking for books in this format, but there jsut aren’t a lot out there.  Though this book seems light and funny, it does have a serious undertone.  Ginny is happy, but life at home is not perfect and slowly as the year progresses, her grades and attitude slip.  Luckily she has her fairy godmother (her grandpa), her friends, and a couple teachers.  This is a rough year not only because it is 7th grade, but also because Ginny acquires a stepfather and her brother turns into a juvenile delinquent.  That would stress any girl out.  I am always surprised by how much you can learn about a character from books like this since there is not narration, you have to draw the conclusions yourself.  I really loved reading about Ginny’s life and hope that we get to heard what happens next.

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In this prequel to the Frog Princess books, we learn how Grassina becomes the Green Witch and how her mother becomes an evil hag.  I enjoyed learning about the characters when they were younger and still love the way Baker writes, but it was rather a sad read for me.  Having read the other books, I know that it is going to take a long, long time before things are put back right again and that can’t help but make me a bit tearful (not literally of course).  However, the characters are well drawn and the spin on fairy tales is as delightful as in the other books.  It was fun to see how everything came to be and why certain people act the way they do.  I would not recommend reading this book before the others in the series even though, chronologically, it comes first.  I think getting a sense of the characters through the Frog Princess books and then reading this one is the way to go.

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In her latest non-Stephanie Plum novel, Evanovich writes a cute, but uninspired story about a man who wants a loan in a small town, but needs a wife to get it. Enter Maggie Toone, a woman who needs some money while she writes the story of her great aunt who happened to be a madame in a brothel. She agrees to his terms, to come and live as a wife in name only for six months. She finds herself attracted to him and he to her and soon it is all she can do to keep her hands off of him. Not the best story ever, but it has some cute elements. She is really slipping in the care and attention she is taking with her writing I feel. I have been disappointed in her last few books and miss the zany humor that had me laughing out loud as I read one. I hope it comes back.

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Stephen Colbert is hysterically funny.  He takes you through the ins and outs of American society as seen through a crazy conservative person.  His book had me laughing out loud so many times (my husband kept asking,”What is he saying?  What? What is so funny?????”) He is pompous and arrogant and utterly irreverent.  He is so un-pc it cracks me up. Yet by going to the extreme he shows just how insane parts of the country have become.  He covers everything from religion to sex to homosexuals to old people and on and on.  It makes you step back and think (as you are cracking up laughing).  A short read, but completely worth every minute you spend with it!  

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Not only is the name of this book secret, so is the plot.  In this humorous book, the author takes the reader on a mad-capped adventure with some interesting characters.  Suitably vague?  I don’t even know if I can talk about the book.  But the author has a way of writing that while not new is certainly clever.  Tell someone to not do something will make them do it right?  And that is-in a sense- what the author is doing here.  He makes a children’s book into a tale of possibly the most secret society on earth (except you don’t know what it is or does)  I enjoyed the point of view of the story and how the author breaks for chapters (sometimes informing readers that they should use the bathroom because the next chapter is a long one).  But what of the story?  Well it centers around Cass and Max-Ernest two seemingly ordinary kids that turn out to have a few tricks up their sleeves.  What makes this story so interesting is not necessarily the secret that is never told, but rather the characters.  Even minor characters are well fleshed out and lend interest and insight into the overall story.  Though a bit long I can see this book becoming a favorite of many. 

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